Tent Safety Tips

When it comes to tent camping, you can never be too careful. What do I mean by that? Well, I have two stories to bring my point to light.

This first story has to do with my grandmother and the fair. You see the fair had several tents set up for food and shelter for the animals. As my grandmother was walking through the fair, she was not aware of the ropes coming off the tents and into the stakes in the ground. Frankly, this is really puzzling to me since she was an avid camper. Well, as she was walking, she tripped over one of the tent stakes. Or, I should say her body went over the stake but her foot got caught in the ropes and remained on the ground. As a result, she developed a stress fracture in her ankle. All of this could have been prevented using the tip below.

tent.safety.tipsThe easiest way of keeping people from tripping over ropes and stakes is to make them visible. I like to first paint my tent stakes with glow in the dark paint. While this would not have helped my grandmother, it would have made them visible during nighttime activities at the fair. The second thing I like to do is to cover them with something brightly colored. When my grandmother went to the fair, the only choice was to use brightly colored ropes. Today, we can use that technique or simply cut pool noodles lengthwise and slip them over the ropes. This makes them easily seen and provides a cushion for anyone that walks into the ropes.

The second story I like to share from a trip to Yellowstone that my daughter and I took several years ago. In just, my daughter could not remember which tent she was in. You see we went with my son’s Boy Scout troop along with my daughter’s Venture Crew. To keep an eye on everyone, the troop provided a tent. While this was wonderful, the problem was they were all the same. In the past, a boy walking into the wrong tent was no problem but when girls came into the picture, tent identification became very important. To prevent any confusion, I came up with a simple technique that is cheap and easy to achieve. What is it? Well, it is a ribbon and glow stick. Tying a ribbon to the zipper pull made identifying the correct tent easy. The glow stick came into play during the evening when the ribbon would not be visible. My daughter could now go to the bathroom, shower house or anywhere else without mom tagging along. No more hearing the screams of surprise when my daughter walked into the wrong tent.

While these two examples of tent safety are unique, it is always important to keep a safe camp and that includes your tent.

Comments