Best Hiking Shoes And Why You Want Them

I did a couple videos on this topic but haven’t yet had a chance to post them. In the meantime let’s talk about what to look for in a pair of hiking shoes and hopefully I’ll get those videos added for you soon so you can see what I’m talking about.

If you’re planning to do a little hiking on your next trip and you’re thinking you’ll just wear a pair of old tennis shoes I’d like to invite you to play a game of pin the tail on the naïve tourist. (wanna guess what part you get to play?)

Here’s the thing. Tennis shoes or running shoes aren’t built for trail conditions. They’re built for running on pavement.

If you don’t believe me go for a 5 mile hike in tennis shoes and let me know how you feel when you get back. After a mile or two you’ll start to feel every pebble and twig you step on and by the time you get back your feet will be in pain and possibly blistered.

If you’d rather skip the blisters, then here what I recommend you do.

Get yourself a dedicated pair of hiking shoes. They have a much firmer sole so that you won’t feel all those pebbles you step on poking into your feet.

I recommend you get something that provides some ankle support since uneven terrain and sometimes slippery conditions make it more likely you’ll roll an ankle.

I also like boots that are either water resistant or waterproof to keep your feet comfortable and dry in soggy conditions.

I remember when my friend Jonathan convinced me to get real hiking shoes. I was planning on doing the naïve tourist thing and wear a pair of tennis shoes for hiking. Fortunately, he talked me out of it. We ended up doing a lot of hiking culminating in a 20 mile hike covering an 8,000 ft elevation change on a trail rated “expert only.” I won’t say my feet felt great at the end of the day but they were blister free and ready to go again the next day. Had I worn tennis shoes I’m certain I wouldn’t have been able to complete the hike. Oh, and don’t forget to wear Smartwool sock underneath these shoes.

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